Timberscombe Methodist Chapel

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Providence Chapel was built, as a Bible Christian Chapel, by brothers Edward and James Cording who farmed at Croydon Farm. The Chapel was opened on 27th March 1836. It cost £150 to build and was handed over free of debt to local trustees in 1839.

James died at the end of 1836.  Edward, who was a local preacher for 52 years, lived until 1886. Edward gave up farming in 1876 and went to live in a house he built opposite the Chapel. Next door was the manse which he also built.

In 1907 the Bible Christians become part of the United Methodist Church and in 1932 this united church joined with the Primitives and the Wesleyans to make the present Methodist Church.

In 1969 the original Bible Christian Circuit (Kingsbrompton) , of which Timberscombe was a part, was amalgamated with two others to form the West Somerset Circuit.

The Chapel contains some interesting features such as the pull out seats at the aisle end of the pews: the central hook and candle; lamp brackets on the walls; and a small gallery.

The east wall contains a memorial to Timberscombe’s preacher Revd J.P. Martin, author of the “Uncle” books. His painting, “Harvest Festival”, now hangs in St Petrock’s Church as gifted by James Currey, grandson of Revd J.P. Martin in July 2019 when the Chapel closed. The deconsecration ceremony for the Chapel took place on 18/08/2019.

James Currey gave a Lecture to the St Petrock’s History Group in July 2019 which is reproduced in full with his permission on our page about Revd J.P. Martin. To read the lecture click HERE .

The lectern was made by local craftsman Mr W. Schofield and is dedicated to Mrs Jane Martin, founder of the Women’s Fellowship, in October 1952.

The cross on the south wall was made by former minister Revd Neville Pugh. The figure-head was made by a friend of an American minister here on an exchange programme.

Victoria County History note on the Providence Chapel Click Here To Read